VATA- Grounding Ourselves for the Winds of Change

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When the winds of change blow, some people build walls, others build windmills”       ~Chinese Proverb

As my students entered the house today, each shivered a little and made a comment about the weather – the wind is gusting and there is a brisk coolness to the air.  Fall has arrived and with it a bluster of action readying ourselves for the close of the year – holiday festivities, school exams, vacations, and family visits.   It can all seem a bit dizzying sometimes.

In the ancient science of Ayurveda, Fall is the VATA time of the year.  VATA represents the elements of Air and Ether.  The wind is strong, the air is cool and dry and life is sooo… busy.  Are you the person who walls themselves in and waits until the winds have passed or do you ride the force of the winds for all they are worth? This depends on who you are and who you were born to be.  Those whose bodies, minds, and emotions are like the wind – flexible, quick,  open to change, always looking for options and on the move, may see this time of year as just another challenge to take head-on.  If this describes you, be mindful of the symptoms of VATA overload:  lack of focus, constipation or gas, numbness / tingling, sharp and inconsistent pain (especially in the lower back), difficulty falling asleep.

The good news is, according to Ayurveda, you can help you find your balance by simply adding in activities and foods which ground you so that you can harness the energy of the winds without getting blown away.  Stay warm and establish routines and rituals.  Do not overexert or overstimulate yourself.  Favor foods and smells that are sweet, heavy and warm.  Avoid raw or cold foods / beverages, erratic habits of eating and exercises, going to bed too late, watching TV or viewing a computer screen late into the evening.

Today we began working on balance and moving within your base of support rather than stiffening and holding on.  When we bring our awareness to what our reactions are to the things in life which throw us off balance a little, we come from a grounded and safe place.  Much like a young, healthy tree, we may sway, but we will not fall over or break.

If you would like to learn more about VATA and Ayurveda, check out this website or many others which are easily found online and consider scheduling a Ayurvedic Counseling Session here at the studio to determine what your dosha-type is, signs and symptoms of imbalance, and recommendations for a personalized, balanced lifestyle.

Restorative Retreat

In need of a mini-retreat but no vacation in sight?  Take 40 minutes out of your day to try the following restorative sequence for a guided practice of intention, acceptance and gratitude. You will emerge refreshed and battle-ready.  Continue reading Restorative Retreat

Putting “Therapy” into Your Yoga

Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured and endure what cannot be cured.  ~BKS Iyengar

I am often asked “What is Yoga Therapy?” and “How is Therapeutic Yoga different from regular yoga and from Physical Therapy or other forms of traditional therapy?”.  First of all, let me say that not all Yoga is “therapeutic” and not all “yoga therapy” is therapeutic for every person.

At the core, Therapeutic Yoga begins with Awareness.  In this, it is very personal and, often, different for different people.  Whether taught privately or in a group, Therapeutic Yoga offers the individual student or client a series of tools to look at themselves and identify what it is he or she desires or needs less/more of.  These tools are usually taken from Yoga, from Ayurveda, from Physical Medicine, and contemporary Psychology.

In a regular class, the student takes positive actions (asana) towards “feeling good”.  In traditional therapy, a patient is relatively passive and the goal is to diagnose (“You are sick”), reduce symptoms and cure disease.  On the contrary, in Therapeutic Yoga, the client is “empowered” with physical, mental and emotional tools and the goal is to adapt and improve.  In some cases, the student will learn that it is not possible to improve the physical state (“The body is sick”) but that adaptations can be made to allow the mental or emotional state to  drastically improve.

“It is less helpful to know the cause of one’s stress than the state of mind when one is stressed”

While starting in the physical body, therapeutic yoga allows insight into the layers of the body, or the Koshas.  These layers are the Physical, the Emotional, the Energetic, the Social, the Intellectual and the Spiritual. The student begins to see how these layers overlap and intersect – how that “trapped” feeling in your neck, shoulders and upper back can be eased with the intention of “freedom” or “surrender” or maybe by becoming more physically grounded and aware of the alignment of the feet and the lower extremities or looking into our social / emotional and noting where he or she may feel stuck.

Once the student has the tools, he or she can put “therapy” into any yoga session.  What is more, the student is ready to put Yoga into his or her life and learn to adapt and improve “off the mat”.

PITTA – Embracing and Balancing the Heat of Summer

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Sometimes it takes a meltdown to cool down.         ~Evinda Lepins

I’m hot, really hot.  Literally, I am actually HOT and wet, according to Yoga’s sister science, Ayurveda, I am a PITTA, which means my body, mind and emotions are guided by the elements of heat and water.   Continue reading PITTA – Embracing and Balancing the Heat of Summer

Legs-up-the-Wall / Viparita Karani

Viparita Karaniphoto credit:  Carmen’s Canvas

It is not the load that breaks you down.  It is the way you carry it.    ~Lou Holtz

Legs-up-the-wall is my very favorite pose – so easy and so profound.   The beauty of this pose starts with the sanskrit name translated into “making action by turning things around”.    The list of ailments of the mind and body that are eased by this pose are endless and yet there is no effort, no prerequisite pose and very few contraindications – you simply find a way to turn yourself upside-down and find the flow.   It is a paradigm-shift. Continue reading Legs-up-the-Wall / Viparita Karani